Shafts


Ryoma Special Tune w/ CRAZY MOFO Prototype Impressions

It’s my 4th Ryoma driver now,  I’m all about these and have been for quite some time.  The D-1 V-Spec has changed my driving game and even my wife plays one.  It’s less stressful on the brain when a mishits fly a lot straighter and longer.  My addiction started with the V-Spec 9.5 degree head.  It was better than anything else I played up until that point but trajectory still was a little low for me,  enter the 10.5 V-Spec which has been in the bag almost forever in club Ho’ing years.

Then more recently it became a 9.5 Special Tune which although higher than 9.5 conforming model it still flew a little low for my bones so…. Here comes my new babe,  The D-1 V-Spec Special Tune but this time in 10.5.  Glory!  It works perfectly and I’m getting 10 yards on average more distance and occasionally 25!  Don’t believe?  Ya Neither do I.  My score has gone up as some holes I have to hit a 3 wood now but I’ll work that out too U guess.

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Diamana B-Series Shafts Announced!

Mitsubishi Rayon introduces the 3rd generation Diamana, The B series, for the athlete golfer. It follows the same concept as previous generation models, but with added improvements to further enhance the consistency. The flex characteristics and torque is precisely measured out to create a shaft that is very neutral and can fit a variety of swing types. It brings a similar characteristics as the previous Blue Board version, but with enhanced consistency and feedback.


New Dialead material is put into use for this new shaft. Dialead is a new high quality carbon material that is used in satellites that are developed to travel in space. It is very light weight and strong against any type of pressure that is applied. This Dialead material is used with the 3D MDI (Multi DImensional Interlay) technology. The 3D MDI is a strategically angled and rolled carbon sheet pattern. The multi layers of the sheets make the shaft very strong against deformation during high speeds. The Dialead material is layered in a 90* cross pattern between the normal carbon sheets to give it an enhanced consistency and feel.  The Diamana B Series is said to be the new standard of shafts for the athlete golfer.

 

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Crazy Prototype Shafts Report and Availability

More on my visit to the Crazy Factory last week. While talking to the guys at Crazy about shaft designs and future products as well as checking out their new Caddy bags I ended up stopping in their back room where they keep some of their stock of shafts. There were several boxes with model names, actually model numbers that I did not recognize so I asked their sales about it and it turns out they have quite a few prototypes they are developing.

As we all know, the Royal Decoration shaft has been one of the most popular and explosive shafts ever offered at TSG. The sub 50g high modulus carbon shaft is a superb distance shaft but due to its light weight and higher torque, was really the best fit for those with very smooth and easy swings. Crazy worked to expand on this and have come out with TWO new RoyDeco prototypes that will be going retail in the fall however we convinced them to let us sell the prototypes to our many Crazy shaft fans! The two prototype models are coded the 513 and 531. They come in similar flexes as the original RoyDeco and are even the same weight with just about the same torque numbers.  The difference is in the way Crazy has redistributed the rigidity of the shaft and changed the flex stiffness slightly as well as the kick points.

The original Royal Decoration shaft is already one of the easiest shafts to load and feel kick before impact. Enter the RoyDeco 513 Prototype which takes this kick to yet another level. For those really struggling to square the face and stop the slice the 513 squares faster and kicks harder than the original thanks to a more active center and tip area. The original RoyDeco is actually stiffer in the tip and softer in the butt for great feel with stability and a mid kick. To counter the more active tip area in the 513, Crazy moved the kick point to a mid high kick which balances out the launch and keeps it strong and penetrating as many found in the original RoyDeco. Its hard to imagine there can be an even harder kicking shaft that the original but the 513 promises to do that!

The new RoyDeco 531 Prototype on the other hand addresses probably the only weakness of the original RoyDeco, and one that exists with any sub 50g shaft really, its ability to match an aggressive hard hitter type of swing.  Crazy has stiffened up the 531 especially in the butt area for more stability and control for the faster swinger. Again they have moved the kick point to mid high to make for a strong penetrating launch. The stiffer butt luckily does not overly effect the feel of the 531 proto thanks to its already high torque numbers but is said to help with those who got aggressive and felt they were overpowering the original RoyDeco. Along with the 513 and 531 Prototypes, Crazy also showed me their Royal Decoration Fairway Wood Prototype shaft. This is a 50g fairway wood shaft made to keep the right side out of play and provide that same great feel and kick and big distance the driver shaft does.

As you may have also noticed a couple of pictures above, there is a 519 Prototype below the 531. The 519 is the 50t replacement for the super popular, hard hitter, aggressive player Crazy Black 50! This mid 60g shaft like the original CB50 is the ultimate control shaft but with improved feel and distance performance.  Crazy is very excited about this shaft especially for players who swing 110 to 130mph!

Now as I mentioned above, the great news is that TSG has access to these Prototypes before they go retail. Prices are the same as their original models and all prototypes are available in white or black. Numbers are very limited so you must contact us directly to order. Get these models before anyone else!


Ryoma and Basileus Install Part 1

I’ve decided to take the plunge and try a new Basileus shaft in one of my Ryoma drivers. Basileus is a brand brought to us by Triphas, a new high modulus shaft maker based out of Akihabara in Tokyo. Basileus has not only decided to use high carbon materials but to also use a more complex fitting and shaft profile system to make sure golfers get the right shaft. I’ve talked about high modulus/high grade carbon many times here on the blog but to those new readers and to refresh everyone’s memories:  Shafts are created with carbon fibers weaved together, and these fibers are measured by their modulus of elasticity in tension. Typical golf shafts are around 24t or 30t, the measurement of tensile strength. These lower grade shafts are more flexible and because of this the shaft is slow to regain its original shape on the downswing creating inconsistent impact where a player must rely heavily on timing due to the flexibility of the shaft.

As the tensile strength increases, the carbon weaves are more dense, more rigid and return more quickly to their original shape. The flex and rebound of the shaft becomes more predictable equaling more consistent shots and much tighter dispersion. The higher tensile ratings ratings in golf shafts are also related to the higher grades containing more glass and metal particles which are more rigid while lower grades containing more flexible rubber particles. Higher grade carbon shafts provide more feel and explosiveness, even though they use those tightly weaved, denser carbon weaves, typically high grade carbon shafts have very active and thinner wall sections which lead to very high but controlled elasticity. While the typical shaft on the market is 20t or 30t grade carbon, Baslieus shafts are all 40t and higher, much like Crazy Shafts.

Many golfers and brands focus on shaft flex and CPMs when choosing a shaft, but the truth is that isn’t the whole story on how a shaft performs.  Looking at a shaft’s rigidity distribution gives golfers a far more understanding of the way a shaft bends and flexes rather than just looking at CPM.  The Japanese have always been very technical, and these kind of measurements, looking at the tip, center and butt stiffness, as well as their ratios in relation to each other, have been available for many JDM brand shafts for many years and some of you probably see a smilar style of flex information being used by Miyazaki Shaft outside of Japan as well (they use 4 points on the shaft and follow IFC Flex code).

These numbers can also be used to interpret how a shaft feels ie whippy or boardy. Too many people immediately associate a shaft that feels “whippy” as too soft but many shafts are designed this way for a purpose and depending on their distribution of rigidity.  Fitters here in Japan use these numbers religiously especially the tip , center and butt numbers which are used to fit a lot of golfers here depending on the swing styles ie smooth and easy or hard and aggressive swingers. Hard hitters who need more control and stability are better suited with a shaft that has a bigger C/B ratio vs a slicer who needs the head to square and release who would do better with a lower C/B ratio. C/B is of course center over butt flex and the larger the C/B number meaning the stiffer the center area of the shaft is in relation to the butt and in turn the smaller the number meaning the softer the center is in relation to the butt.  It’s also good to look at the actual flex at the butt point as this is the section of the shaft that is directly connected to our body and thus relays the most feel (or lack of depending on the butt flex). So in the end picking up a shaft and wobbling and declaring it whippy could only mean the butt is pretty darn stiff and the tip is soft so it creates that wobbly feeling.

Shaft fitters also look at the T/C number or tip over center flex which can dictate the ball flight of a shaft. The smaller the T/C number usually the higher the launch and the bigger the T/C number usually the stiffer the tip and the lower the launch as well as more control.  Simply looking at things like R flex or S flex or even 250cpm in the end don’t really say how a shaft feels or performs, its a combination of all these numers including CPM. Basileus realized golfers and even fitters have a hard time understanding how different shaft models flex so they used these T/C and C/B numbers to create their own fitting chart with all their shaft models.

So this chart is very useful for a guy like me who likes numbers and specs. Without trying the shaft I decided on getting the Fiamma 50 shaft as my natural bad shot is a slice (though I can hook the ball but that is more due to trying to over adjust and avoid the slice). The more flex or active tip of the Fiamma wil help the shaft square to the ball and hit that nice draw I want. Its made for distance, with a stiffer center to butt section allowing for the player to feel the head kick and provide a nice launch for max carry.  Its a good replacement for the stock Ryoma FS-1 shaft. Now flexes aside, I wish Basileus and all other manufacturers for that matter would provide actual numbers at each tip, center and butt point (ie as I said above, how many kg it takes to bend that point 2mm). These numbers would give me a better idea of how stiff the Fiamma actually is. For example by looking at these numbers for the following shafts:

Butt: 28.9 Center: 19.3 Tip: 8.9 Crazy Black TJ-80 Stiff
Butt: 24.4 Center: 16.2 Tip: 7.5 Fubuki K Stiff

We can determine that the TJ-80 is stiffer all through its range than the Fubuki K in the same stiff flex. We can also use these numbers to calculate the T/C and C/B numbers. So while I have the actual T/C and C/B ration for the Basileus shafts, I don’t know what flex numbers were used to arrive at those ratios. So in this case I could choose the right shaft characteristics but without knowing how stiff the shaft plays.  I assumed being high modulus carbon it would play on the stiffer side as Crazy shafts do but I didn’t know until I installed it today.

So I checked the CPM and specs of the Ryoma D-1 with its stock shaft before pulling it and it came out to 45.25″, 290g D1 and 226CPM.  This is very a very typical reading for a stock shaft in Regular flex. On the soft side which helps players square up and provide lots of feel. I decided to install the Fiamma 50 Regular with the same 45.25″ length since I’m comfortable with it and it’d be a good comparison for performance.  The shaft is a tad heavier than the stock shaft by about 4 grams so I used a slightly lighter grip by about 2 grams and the final specs were the same 45.25″ length, 292g and D1 with a CPM of 228!! Now this surprised me, I thought for sure the CPM would come out higher with the Fiamma using tightly wound 40t high modulus carbon which should flex and return to shape faster creating higher CPM. However it turns out it is just as soft as the stock shaft (keep in mind that this is for the Fiamma 50, we have not yet confirmed how the other models CPM).  Now once again remember CPM is only a guide to general stiffness, it still won’t say how the shaft performs.  An interesting thing is I used to play an a Crazy LY01 Nero R2 flex (soft Regular) and it came out at around 236CPM with the LY01 regular around 244cpm. CPM aside, if the shaft is stable and strong, I’ll be very happy! We’ll find that out Monday when I take the driver for 18 holes at Katsuura.

From a first impressions standpoint, the shafts are very pretty, Basileus says they use real silver plating (which surely drives up the cost).  I like the look but some may find it too reflective. In the long run we’ll see how this finish holds up to scratches and marks. Stay tuned for Part 2 in a few days but in the mean time you can check out more Basileus shafts in the pro shop!


Diamana X – Finally a High Modulus Carbon Model!

 
Mitsubishi Rayon has once again decided to delve into the high modulus carbon shaft segment currently dominated by Crazy, Quadra, Bangvoo, ATTAS and others.  They have decided to release an all new premium high modulus carbon model dubbed the Diamana X. Unlike the limited Stinger model which used an existing boron material, Diamana has gone to its own MCHC Group (Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings Corporation) in order to develop an all new 78t high grade carbon sheet to be used in the X. The Diamana X will be limited to only 5000 pieces and is focused on the athlete golfer/pro and better golfer with a special emphasis on the stability and control for the hard hitter wanting even more distance.

Mitsubishi incorporates a new manufacturing technology they developed called Tough-QURE. Its a new technique used for carbon fiber composite moulding which allows Mitsubishi to cure carbon prepregs at a lower temperature and faster speed.  The faster speed allows Mitsubishi two benefits, one to incorporate Black Copolymer Technology which increases durability and two less resin flow which creates carbon that allows for better and more consistent formability thus great for a perfectly rounded shaft with less deformation and inconsistencies.

Thanks to lower torque, consistent load and unload from 78t carbon as well as increased overall stability due to less rounding and deformation, the Diamana X is designed to supress side spin and transfer maximum power by squaring to the target predictably and reducing off center hits.  March 3rd is the release date for the new X shaft and we will start taking pre orders soon. There will be 5 models/flexes as seen in the table below topped off by a 70 XX flex with a mere 2.2* of torque. The Diamana X has a mid to high kick made for a strong penetrating launch combined with lots of run.  So far Mitsubishi Rayon has listed a MSRP of  68250 yen which translates to about 900.00 USD. We have yet to see what the street price will but we’ll surely be below that.


NGS Japan Releases 40t 50t 80t D Rev Shaft Lineup!

NGS, a premium Japanese shaft maker who has brought us their top performing shafts in the past like the Mach Line Proto series and D Rev Tour lines has decided to join the high grade carbon market with the launch of their new D Rev lineup. High Modulus carbon has been all the rage in Japan over the last few years with brands like Crazy, Quadra Composite Techno, Muziik Bangvoo and Honma offering shafts produced with higher quality carbon materials than pretty much every other brand in golf.

So how does carbon grading work? Shafts are created with carbon fibers weaved together, and these fibers are measured by their modulus of elasticity in tension. Typical golf shafts are around 24t or 30t, the measurement of tensile strength. These lower grade shafts are more flexible and because of this the shaft is slow to regain its original shape on the downswing creating inconsistent impact where a player must rely heavily on timing due to the flexibility of the shaft.

As the tensile strength increases, the carbon weaves are more dense, more rigid and return more quickly to their original shape. The flex and rebound of the shaft becomes more predictable equaling more consistent shots and much tighter dispersion. The higher tensile ratings ratings in golf shafts are also related to the higher grades containing more glass and metal particles which are more rigid while lower grades containing more flexible rubber particles. Higher grade carbon shafts provide more feel and explosiveness, even though they use those tightly weaved, denser carbon weaves, typically high grade carbon shafts have very active and thinner wall sections which lead to very high but controlled elasticity.

NGS will be offering 3 high carbon models, the D Rev Rey, D Rev Seve and D Rev BB.

The Rey is their top of the line model featuring full length 80t carbon reinforced with a 4 axis weave. The Rey is designed for balanced distance performance and stability and is aimed at the faster and more aggressive swinger and better player. Ranging from SR S to X flex and 65-67.5 grams as well as 3.3* of torque for all flexes, the Rey is a firm shaft throughout its length especially from the center towards the butt. According to my shaft bible, the S Flex of the Rey CPM’s out 5 cycles higher than the already pretty stiff Crazy TJ-80 S flex!  The Rey is a mid trajectory shaft and can handle even the strongest players trying to muscle it.

The Seve is their second full length 80t model and it is designed to produce maximum elasticity and energy transfer for maximum distance performance. The Seve has a softer butt than the
Rey and similar center stiffness. The tip however is not as firm as the Rey for a slightly higher launch and more active kick at impact.  Torque is slightly higher at 3.6* and the SR and S flex are 58 and 60 grams respectively. Again it CPM’s out as high as the Crazy TJ-80 and the Rey but this is really a trend we see at TSG with higher grade carbon, they tend to CPM out high but don’t necessarily play that way (again showing that CPM is just a reference).

The third model is the BB which is aimed at more mortal golfers ie the average golfer and improving player.  The BB itself is available in 3 weights the 45, 55 and 65.  The BB features a double mix of 40t and 50t carbon for an explosive impact, higher launch and larger kick sensation.  The BB45 is a sub 50g shaft that looks to compete with the Royal Decoration shaft from Crazy. The BB45 is available in A, R and SR flexes ranging from 47-49g. The BB55 is available in R, SR and S flexes. The BB55 was tested out in the shaft bible and showed to have average butt and tip stiffness but a softer mid section which results in the shafts feel and kick. The BB55 CPM’ed out quite a bit lower than the Rey and Seve (nearly 30 cpm lower for a similar S flex). The BB65 is available in R, SR and S flexes in low to mid 60g range. Looking at the BB and its distribution of flex across the shaft it looks to benefit the smoother swinger who battles the right side and is looking for more of a draw and more distance.

We’re looking forward here at TSG to getting a chance to test these shafts out. NGS has made some great shafts and with their shaft making expertise these should be great performers.  The Rey and Seve retail for around 695.00 with a street price at TSG of about 575.00 while the BB retails at 595.00 with a street price of about 495.00 at TSG. Look for the new NGS shafts in the Pro Shop soon!


2012 Shaft Bible – more on shaft flex and performance

Every year I wait for October to roll around so I can get my copy of Gakken’s SHAFT & TUNE publication. I use this “Mook” (they call publications which are a cross between a magazine and a book a Mook here in Japan!) religiously through the year as my shaft bible. While many people talk about basic shaft characteristics like flex and CPM, this 160 page mook takes a look at all the most recent model shafts and delves much deeper than just flex. Every shaft’s performance characteristics are analyzed and compared by installing every single shaft in the same head at the same finished length with the same grip.

Even before they install each shaft, the properly test each shafts rigidity distribution which gives golfers a far more understanding of the way a shaft bends and flexes rather than just looking at CPM.  This year the mook used five different points, the tip, tip&center, center, center&butt and butt sections of each shaft, all measured for flex by seeing how many kg it takes to bend that point 2mm.  The Japanese have always been very technical and these kind of measurements have been available for many JDM brand shafts for many years and some of you probably see a smilar style of flex information being used by Miyazaki Shaft outside of Japan as well (they use 4 points and follow IFC Flex code). These measurements done side by side with every shaft model give a better idea of how a shaft flexes under load and ultimately how it bends especially compared with each other.

These numbers can also be used to interpret how a shaft feels ie whippy or boardy. Too many people immediately associate a shaft that feels “whippy” as too soft but many shafts are designed this way for a purpose and depending on their distribution of rigidity.  Fitters here in Japan use these numbers religiously especially the tip , center and butt numbers which are used to fit a lot of golfers here depending on the swing styles ie smooth and easy or hard and aggressive swingers. Hard hitters who need more control and stability are better suited with a shaft that has a bigger C/B ratio vs a slicer who needs the head to square and release who would do better with a lower C/B ratio. C/B is of course center over butt flex and the larger the C/B number meaning the stiffer the center area of the shaft is in relation to the butt and in turn the smaller the number meaning the softer the center is in relation to the butt.  It’s also good to look at the actual flex at the butt point as this is the section of the shaft that is directly connected to our body and thus relays the most feel (or lack of depending on the butt flex). So in the end picking up a shaft and wobbling and declaring it whippy could only mean the butt is pretty darn stiff and the tip is soft so it creates that wobbly feeling.

Shaft fitters also look at the T/C number or tip over center flex which can dictate the ball flight of a shaft. The smaller the T/C number usually the higher the launch and the bigger the T/C number usually the stiffer the tip and the lower the launch.  Simply looking at things like R flex or S flex or even 250cpm in the end don’t really say how a shaft feels or performs.

Besides having tables listing for all the shafts with the flex points, T/C, C/B data and CPM data as well as balance points and swing weight and static weights before and after install, launch data like launch angle, back spin, apex, carry and run etc, the Reshaft & Tune mook also does a writeup on each specific shaft and its characteristics including its ability to square to the ball, the type of trajectory it creates ranging from low to high, it’s feel and recommended swing speed ranges as well as the player it is best suited for. I frequently have this sitting by my desk all throughout the year as it covers not only driver shafts but FW and UT shafts as well as Iron shafts including  both steel and graphite.  I actually refer to the book many times as well as you may have seen in my blog posts here about club making and shaft fitting.

In the end though, while having a useful resource like this mook, it goes to show how darn difficult it is to choose and find the right shaft. Choosing a great performing shaft for ones swing is down right difficult especially finding THE optimal shaft. We can all obviously swing any shaft, but the right one will optimize performance to the fullest. It’s a difficult science but then again who ever said golf was easy!


Crazy Opens new Manufacturing Facility!

With increased demand and huge growth in popularity all throughout Japan, Crazy has opened a new manufacturing facility right next to the Crazy Factory in Adachi.  As many people know, the Crazy Factory is in fact the flagship store and not the actual “factory”, the main building is a work shop, offices, several hitting bays, gym, showers and recreational areas. Having the plant right next door to the main shop will be very convenient for production and supply. “Hey we need more TJ-80 6.9 and 8.7 flex shafts!” “Okay we’ll just go next door and hand roll some new ones!”.

I’ll be stopping by in Adachi in the next few weeks to look at some new products and tour the new facility as well to document their shaft making process. Can’t wait to have them make my shaft right in front of me!


Crazy Target Tour Steel Shafts Initial Impressions

There has been a lot of excitement since Crazy announced the release of their newly designed Target Tour steel shafts. People wondered what a company like Crazy, who specializes in high modulus carbon shafts, would create when it comes to steel. As I had noted a few weeks ago when I posted about the introduction of the new shafts, Crazy is using a proprietary technique derived from ancient Japanese sword making to control the hardness and shape of each Target Tour steel shaft.  By controlling the hardness via high frequency heat, Crazy actually stops short of completely hardening the shaft. Like a Japanese Katana/sword, it gives the shaft the proper flexibility yet firmness for optimal feel and performance.  Crazy has designed the Target Tours to have the consistency of steel but the playability and feel of carbon. This tedious process involves much more work for each individual shaft but at the same time gives each shaft much more attention to detail, thus more consistent performance.

While I was at Crazy a couple of weeks ago I finally had a chance to check out the shafts and test them first hand. First to clarify a few things. There are two models of iron shafts 120 and 105 and two models of wedge shafts 120 and 110. The iron shafts are stepped while the wedge shafts are not. The iron shafts are also constant weight models meaning they keep a similar weight and feel across the set. They are all taper tip and each model is available in two finishes, a standard steel finish (silver chrome) and a darker tinted finish (dark chrome). The Dark Chrome finish is NOT black but more like a tinted smoke finish. It was very hard to capture the different shaft finishes under any light and I tell you now I tried as hard as I could, indoors and outdoors and with lights and without. So those expecting black shafts, the dark chrome is nothing like that and even in the pictures here they look darker than they actually are in real life.

Crazy sales described the Target Tour 120 as heaver and stiffer iron shaft made for the faster and harder swinger who still wants a stable shaft that provides maximum feel and distance in the form of a strong kick and penetrating launch.  I could not properly test the Tour 120’s as they were too heavy and stiff for me so I’ll leave that up to Chris when he gets his demo set. I did however try the Target Tour Lite 105 in Regular flex and the Target Tour Wedge 110. The Tour Lite 105 cut and installed weighs under 100g which compares favorably to the Crazy Black CB-02 graphite iron shaft. In fact hitting the two side by side, the Target Tour Lite 110 steel shaft has feel almost as good as its much more expensive graphite counterpart.  The 110 is made for the player who wants lighter weight steel that provides a slightly higher launch and trajectory but with plenty of feel and in my short testing it sure seems to fit those characteristics.  Years ago when lightweight steel began hitting the market, shafts like Nippon’s NS Pro 950GH were a revelation for those wanting easier to load steel shafts that gave easy launches. The Crazy Target Tour Lite takes that to the next level with superb feel and launch.

The Target Tour Wedge 110 was quite firm and even though Crazy marks all the wedge models as Wedge flex, Crazy says they are pretty much a stiff flex. Crazy explained to me the wedge shafts are designed to provide consistent feel and spin performance.  The mid kicking wedge shafts are meant to create a heavier spin ball by using a stronger mid trajectory ball. The strong trajectory also allows for better direction and stability around the greens. I’ll be shafting up a couple of wedges with the Wedge 110 for testing on the course later this month for a real review.

The new Crazy Target Tour shafts certainly look very good and sound very good. They also cost more than pretty much any other steel shaft. This however has not stopped people from ordering them. Crazy’s first batch of the dark chrome shafts have been long sold out and there are only a few of the standard silver finish shafts left. Are they worth the price tag they have? That is yet to be determined but their design and initial feel and performance (at least of the Lite 105) look to be very promising. Because stock is so low right now we have not listed them in the pro shop yet. If you are interested in a set of some wedge shafts please contact us directly for a quote.


Crazy Fairway Wood Shafts – Which One?

I was sure able to learn a lot by spending 4 hours or so at Crazy last Tuesday, so the posts with Crazy info continue.  When I sat and talked with Crazy sales one thing we agreed is that with so many great shafts, it can be hard for a customer to choose the right one. Sometimes lost behind their great driver shafts is Crazy’s awesome lineup of fairway wood shafts. But what are the characteristics of each shaft? There are currently 3 dedicated FW shafts in Crazy’s lineup, the FW-80, FW-50 Sigma, and the Longest Yard FW-01 Evolution.

The FW-80 is the longest standing model and has been around for about 2 years while the other two were released earlier this year.  The FW-80 was not updated (though the graphics changed slightly) for a reason, its simply Crazy’s best all around fairway wood shaft. Made from full sheets of 80t carbon, it is a balanced shaft that provides distance and control and thanks to the highest grade 80t carbon, is very consistent at squaring up. It does not require the player to worry about timing of any kind, they can just swing away and the shaft does the work.  Because of this its still the most popular choice as Crazy actually considers it “easy to use”.  The FW-80 helps with a nice higher launch and is very stable which has allowed many players to also use the shaft in longer length utilities.  The FW-80 ranges from 6.4 flex (regular) to 8.7 flex (XX) and weighs between 63-70 grams.  In order to save costs as cutting away 80t is not cheap, the FW-80 like all Crazy shafts is precut for install meaning no tipping required for a 3 wood. I’ve had the FW-80 in both a fairway wood and a utility and its uncanny ability square up is a superb quality. Add to that the shaft’s pop and its a fantastic FW performer.

The Longest Yard FW-01 Evolution is a redesign of the original LY FW-01 from a couple of years ago. It is lighter weight ranging from 58-64g grams and features a low mid kick. The FW-01 has mid torque of around 4.7-4.4* which is the highest among Crazy’s FW shafts. The FW-01 has a primary focus of distance. Its lighter weight is easier to swing and its higher torque provides more feel. The 46/40t hybrid construction provides high ball speeds plus stability. If you need more distance with your woods then the FW-01 is your choice with a strong and powerful trajectory and less spin. Flexes range from 5.9 flex (soft regular) to 7.7 flex (SX). This is the recommended shaft a well for those who want a lighter overall club. A favorite of average golfers and slower swingers.

The FW-50 Sigma is the new model on the block aimed at control and stability with a heavier feel for the faster swinger and harder hitter. Made with 50t full sheets of premium carbon, the FW-50 weighs 73-76 grams and features lower torque ranging from 3.3 to 2.9.  Typically Crazy’s 50t shafts play on the stiffer side and the Sigma is no exception with flexes ranging from 7.4 (stiff) to 8.7 (XX). Crazy recommends the FW-50 for players wanting more control and accuracy in the shorter woods.

The Crazy Black Utility is the the only one offering Crazy has for hybrids and utilities. It is however a very good shaft with both superb control and feel. Torque is a touch on the higher side at 3.9 to 3.7* which provides very good feedback and weight is between 80 and 86 grams depending on flex.  The Black Utility is a mid to high kick shaft for those who want to keep their launch down and more stability in their shots. The Black Utility is available in R, S and X flexes and seems to really excel for Utilities 40″ or shorter.

So there you have Crazy’s fairway woods and utility shaft offerings. All the shafts are ultra high grade starting with the Utility at 40t and up to the FW80 at 80t.  Depending on what you are looking for and your swing style, one of these shafts can certainly work for you. As always we are here to help so feel free to contact us for advice.



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